SPOTLIGHT - JESS CLARK

What does adventure mean to you Jess?
Adventure to me is the constant search for life's highlights. Those moments where you're scared, excited, and completely out of your mind, yet somehow still manage to calculate risks and surprise yourself every step of the way.

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Tell us a little about your self?
My adventurous self can be very impulsive, and also extremely cautious. I think the combination of characteristics has served me well and will continue to... The activities I like range from extreme to mellow. The thing that really gets me going is combining the two. For example, I love to slackline, but when the snow arrives in Canada how the hell can you slackline?! You do it in socks and have your mate constantly dust the snow off the line like a curling rink, that's how! Figuring out how to accomplish things that others find impossible or absurd is what I love. That being said, finding likeminded people is what really makes these adventures possible. Adventure Junky connects so many people and places that it's much easier to find epic adventurers these days. It's like one big tribe all coming together in an app.

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What was your BEST adventure?
My best adventure so far has been learning to kiteboard. I remember seeing people doing it on the beach about 5 years ago. I was so unsure of myself back then that the possibility of accomplishing it or even trying it never even popped into my head. I simply thought "wow those people are so intensely awesome" and went about my life. 5 rotations around the sun later, I suddenly got the courage and the motivation to try it. Second day on the water I was harnessing the wind and riding on the ocean screaming at the top of my lungs from sheer stoke. I don't remember a time when I've been that excited and happy within myself. (Girls, you can do it! Don't doubt yourself!)

What's at the top of your Bucket List?
Right now, the top of my bucket list is completing my Commercial Helicopter Pilot License. Learn to fly, then fly away!

What is your favourite object to travel with?
Aside from being an adventure junky, I'm also a creative junky and video has been a passion of mine since highschool. So my GoPro and my drone are my favourite objects to travel with.

Anything else weird, wild or wonderful you want to share about yourself?
Wild: My hair.
Wonderful: I can confidently say that I have a huge heart, and gladly open it to anyone if it can help make their day better. We all could use a little more open-ness and vulnerability. Whole-hearted living and loving is where it's at peeps 🤙🏻

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Do you have any feedback for the Adventure Junky app?
Keep inspiring people... seriously that's what you're doing. Your app is innovative and will constantly grow. Enjoy the process of this journey with all the ups and downs and don't change your spirit because that is what makes the app. Without that, it wouldn't be what it is!

Keep following her adventures...
On the app: Jess Clark
Instagram: @jessclarkcreative

ADVENTURE OF THE WEEK: CANYONING IN TYROL

Around AREA 47 you have plenty of opportunities to explore the Alps in a particularly spectacular way. While canyoning in Otztal you get straight down to business - you discover a realm which would otherwise only be accessible using a rope and with a great deal of bravery!

While abseiling through thundering waterfalls, leaping from metres high cliff into the dark green puddles and while sliding at speed through gullies you get to see who has nerves of steel. 

See this adventure on the app

MEET THE JUNKYS...

Behind every great App is a great founder or two...
Here’s our attempt to take you behind the scenes to hear what inspired us to create the Adventure Junky App.

LIKE what you hear? Well it takes a tribe to change the world so download the app and tell your friends, SHARE this post. Thanks for being part of our community (:

#AddedAdventures, #self-guided

JON COLLINS CLINCHES 'ADVENTURE JUNKY OF THE YEAR 2016'

Download the full Media Release.

Sydney-based scientist and photographer Jon Collins was today named the ‘2016 Adventure Junky of the Year’ after a tight race with Ecuadorian adventurer Isabel Robinson.  John beat close to 10,000 competitors for the cash grand prize, completing over 50 adventures in destinations as diverse as Ethiopia, Nepal, Mongolia and West Papua. 

Adventure Junky Co-founder Fuchsia Claire Sims summed up Jon's tremendous achievement. “We’ve gave our community a simple brief - share with us your best adventures and become co-creators of the app - but only those that are ‘high’ on experience, and ‘low’ on impact will make the cut.  Jon Collins, our 2016 winner, excelled in this regard. He represents a new tribe of traveller, actively seeking out experiences that respect people and place, that are both authentic and adventurous.”

Below is just a small sample of Jon's adventures. To see them all jump on the Adventure Junky App and head for the Leaderboard for Jon's full profile.

#AddedAdventures, #nutjob, #topo, #tribal, #tripper

2016 ADVENTURE OF THE YEAR - The trans ecuadorian mountain bike route (TEMBR)

The ‘2016 Adventure of the Year’ went to Belgian long distance cyclist Peter Vansumere and the punishing 1,250 km Trans Ecuadorian Mountain Bike Route (TEMBR) that runs the length of the country’s volcanic corridor. Not only did Peter finish the lonely, rutted, white-knuckle ride, he did so in record time to ensure he met the December 31 deadline for the 2016 competition. Bonus points were in order.

Download the full Media Release.

#AddedAdventures, #self-guided

THE BEST OF 2016

2016 goes down as the year the Adventure Junky App became the playing-field for adventure travellers of every genre to share their latest and find their next adventure. In the closing weeks of 2016 alone, thousands of adventures were submitted by our community. Here's a selection of the year's finest.

  • Surfing the North Sea, Lofoten, Norway
  • Street art safari, Melbourne, Australia
  • Kayaking the length of Lake Malawi, Tanzania
  • Snorkelling between tectonic plates, Iceland
  • Rappelling down Angel Falls, Venezuela
  • The Trans Ecuadorian Mountain Bike Route
  • Hiking the cloud forests of Costa Rica
  • Photographing star-trails in US Ghost towns
  • Sami Reindeer gatherings in Lapland, Finland
  • Skydiving out of a C17 Globemaster
  • Trekking with Berbers across Morocco
  • Following the Butterfly trails, Mexico
  • Homestay with Kazakh eagle-hunters, Mongolia
  • Orphanage volunteering in Vietnam

Download the full Media Release.

#bonfire, #intel, #self-guided, #tribal

ADVENTURE JUNKY MEETS TRAVEL, LIVE, PLAY

WOop woop... when you get home to find your Travel Play Live magazine in the letterbox... and open it to find the first article is yours! What a way to kick start 2017, and a great reminder to have a more powerful voice when it comes to the future of travel and how we can positively shape & impact our planet and our own lives by simply returning to nature.

Get the full magazine and more here...

#media, #Adventurelog

ADVENTURE JUNKY BACKGROUNDER

Adventure Junky is a rapidly growing social platform, helping travellers share their latest and find their next adventure. It has been designed with the Millennial in mind, the world’s biggest demographic, forecast to outpace Baby Boomers in earnings by 2018. Millennials are making a conscious move away from mass tourism. They seek travel that respects the people and place it visits, that is both authentic and adventurous.

The Adventure Junky App currently features 1,000 adventures in 100 different countries. User-generated content plays a big role. Each month we receive a constant stream of adventures, submitted by our community, hoping for inclusion on the app. Our curation team, guided by the Adventure Travel Trade Association and UNWTO, ensure only those adventures that are ‘high’ on experience and ‘low’ on impact make the cut.

Adventure Junky’s point of difference is gamification – the use of elements that you would find in a game – to tap into the Millennial’s competitive spirit, keep them connected to their travel goals and satisfy their need for acknowledgement. Each adventure is allocated a points score. The more adventures you add or complete, the more points you earn, and the higher up the Leaderboard you go – perhaps even as high as the ‘Earth’s Number 1 Adventure Junky’.

As the world moves towards 2 billion travellers worldwide in the next few years, there’s no guarantee our environments and cultures, upon which the tourism industry relies on, can withstand the growth. Adventure Junky’s approach is innovative. By making ‘sustainable travel’ a game, we aim to save the planet - one adventure at a time.

Adventure Junky is partnering with like-minded individuals and organisations in its mission. This includes content partnerships with leading destination marketers (Tourism Australia, Sweden, Greenland, Quebec) and best-practice operators including World Expeditions, Intrepid, Peregrine and Icelandic Mountain Guides.

Adventure Junky is an Australian start-up, founded by Fuchsia Sims and Nigel Malone. Their combined experience spans branding, travel, technology, economics and sustainability. The Chairman of Adventure Junky is John Morse AM, former head ofTourism Australia. We thank you for your support in advance, and look forward to seeing you on the Leaderboard.

More information:     www.adventurejunky.com            
Facebook        www.facebook.com/adventurejunky
Instagram        www.instagram.com/adventurejunkys

Download this Backgrounder as a PDF.

Sources: Portrait of the Millennial Traveler 2016, Skift, Millennial Week fact sheet, G brief, Adventure Travel Trade Association, UNWTO

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK SEVEN

Congratulations to Jon Collins for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week
with ‘Eagle Hunters Homestay’.


Check out Jon's winning adventure below, and be sure to 

Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a Gift Pack from Patagonia.

Olgii in Western Mongolia is a 54 hour bumpy bus journey (yes, you read correctly) from the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. The township is less than 30,000 people, and is as close to a Wild West movie set that you'll find in a real place. Signs in old Cyrillic script peel off crumbling buildings, barking dogs roam the streets and mini dust storms cross through the town. The only supermarket in town has empty shelves and stocks of canned goods as if the apocalypse has hit. Yet, in the surrounds of the deadbeat town of Olgii is the magnificent shape of mountains, stretching far into the Altai National Park where the last remaining eagle hunters reside. 

Staying with an eagle hunting family is difficult to do independently, but not impossible for the persistent adventurers. Often asking those in Olgii that speak English is a good first step, and walking amongst the camps and guesthouses to find any other foreigners who may like to join you could help reduce costs (don't worry, in a town this size they're easy to find). Often people have family connections or know someone who knows someone, who can help transport you to these remote locations for a fixed cost. I managed to coordinate a jeep drop-off with a guy in town which cost roughly $100, shared between myself and another.   

Like most people in Mongolian, the eagle hunting families are nomadic, and they shift their tented homes called gers, every few months to different isolated locations. While the transport to these locations might seem pricey, hospitality in Mongolia is an uniquely 'open-door' policy, and often you will be refused when trying to offer money for a homestay. While the eagle hunters in Altai are Kazakh, and are inherently different in their culture, language and look different to the rest of Mongolians, they are equally hospitable and welcoming to foreigners.

The eagle hunters hunt in Winter, but herd sheep or goats in other seasons of the year for livelihood. Their daily routine each season is generally monotonous until it's time to move, and in nomadic households children don't go to school due to isolation. Inside the ger it is cosy and intimate, with every member of the family sleeping in a different corner, and the insides decorated in large rugs and animal furs. Often when an animal is killed, the good parts (i.e. intestines, heart, lungs) are hung to dry inside the ger next to the bed.

A stay with a Kazakh family is not for the faint hearted, as they'll watch and almost force you to eat the best parts! In my week staying with the family, I sat down to eat a boiled horses head, hard as rock cheese, alcohol horses milk, cheap Russian vodka, stale wafers, buttery tea and many other things I still have no idea what they could be!

Adventure by Jon Collins

Jon focuses his travels on the continents of Asia and Africa, he loves night markets, climbing large mountains, boab trees, ancient souqs, Sichuan peppers and taking photographs!

 

 




Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 

You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

 

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK SIX

Congratulations to Peter Vansumere for the best ‘added adventure’ of the
week with ‘Darien National Park’.


Check out Peter's winning adventure below, and be sure to 

Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a Gift Pack from The North Face.

My best adventure ever! My friend Tom and I tried to cross the Darien Gap from Panama to Colombia. We made it to 5 km from the border and got ourselves arrested by the Panamanian military who escorted us back.

We discovered true indigenous villages far away from 'civilization' where there were some people who had never seen a white man. We spent a night in a jungle jail, crossed raw jungle, met the most incredible people and scenery, saw lots of wildlife and a unique way of life in the jungle.

This area is entirely untouched by tourism, and, quite literally, my favourite adventure in my lifetime! If this adventure is of the remotest interest you must read up about the Darien Gap and it's incredible adventure folklore!

Adventure by Peter Vansumere

Peter is from Belgium and loves the world! For the past 15 months he has been travelling everywhere on his bicycle, along the way he loves to hike, climb, swim and push him self out his comfort zone!

 

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 

You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK FIVE

Congratulations to Nadim Kestilä for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week
with ‘Lapland Reindeer Gatherings’. 

Check out Nadim's winning adventure below, and be sure to
Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a Gift Pack from The North Face.

I went to Lapland for reindeer gatherings in the indigenous Sami lands. The ever so kind Sami people took me in as one of their own and I stayed with them for 6 days and helped them with their reindeers. Reindeer gatherings are a once a year occasion.

The idea is that every year there are new reindeers to mark. We gathered all the reindeer from the forests and the mountains to a large pen and then as smaller groups to a smaller pen. Then we separate which one belongs to whom and mark them.

The experience was amazing and people were extremely kind. Sami people are the only indigenous people in Europe and have hundreds of years worth of experience in reindeer herding.


Adventure by Nadim Kestilä

Nadim is from Helsinki, and thinks getting lost is finding the way... we could not agree more!

 

 

 

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 
You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK FOUR

Congratulations to Hannah Jones for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week with ‘Gran Cenote’. 

Check out Hannah's winning adventure below, and be sure to 

Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a Gift Pack from Patagonia.

Just a short cycle from the town of Tulum, Gran Cenote is one of the most beautiful places in the world... where you can swim through caves from one tranquil waterhole to another!

If you're feeling really adventurous you can do a guided dive through the deepwater channels. The water is beautifully fresh (and cold!), there's even turtles in the shallows.

This is one of many cenotes (waterholes) scattered among the area, no need for a tour bus or taxi, a bicycle, a set of snorkels and a brave sense of adventure is all you need!

 

Adventure by Hannah Jones

From hiking to diving Hannah lives for adventures!

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

 

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 
You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK THREE

Congratulations to Rocio Trujillo for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week with ‘Marcahuasi Stone Forest’. 

Check out Rocio's winning adventure below, and be sure to 

Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a Gift Pack from Patagonia.

An ancient ruin site perched on a plateau in the Andes mountains, Marcahuasi was made famous by archaeologist Daniel Ruso in his book, Marcahuasi: The Story of a Fantastic Discovery. According to the book, it was believed that the ruins contain at least 22 vortexes of three different kinds of healing energies.

Marcahuasi is located near the Peruvian village of San Pedro de Casta. The villagers of San Pedro De Casta are thought to be the guardians of the ruins, and ask for a small fee from visitors who would like to see the site. After paying the fee, amateur explorers embark on a seven kilometre trek to the ruins, ascending mountains that disappear into the clouds.

The site features stone formations thought to be around 10,000 years old. The strange rocks resemble human, animal, and religious figures, and are thought to be the remains of a pre-Incan civilization, although there is some debate on where these structures actually came from. While many believe that the rocks were carved, it is also possible that simple erosion created the formations. There are also a number of ancient structures that prove there was a form of civilization at some point in the past lending credence to the theory that the rocks were created with intent.

Take a colectivo from Lima to Chosica (one hour). From there take a bus to San Pedro de Casta (3 or 4 hours). The bus will travel slowly up the mountain and you will see the landscape change from warm with tropical fruit trees, to cold and elevated.

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Adventure by Rocio Trujillo

Rocio loves...  nature, trees, mountains, landscapes, cats, travel and adventures!

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

 

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 
You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK TWO

Congratulations to Lana Jünor for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week with ‘Kaieteur Falls’. 

Check out Lana's winning adventure below, and be sure to
Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a a 'surprise pack' of Poler Stuff goodies valued at US$250.

Kaieteur Falls is the world's highest single drop waterfall, located on the Potaro River in the Kaieteur National Park, in Essequibo, Guyana. Its location is in the Amazon forest. It is 226 metres (741 ft) high when measured from its plunge over a sandstone and conglomerate cliff to the first break. It then flows over a series of steep cascades that, when included in the measurements, bring the total height to 251 metres (822 ft). 

While many falls have greater height, few have the combination of height and water volume, and Kaieteur is among the most powerful waterfalls in the world with an average flow rate of 663 cubic metres per second (23,400 cubic feet per second). Kaieteur Falls is about four times higher than Niagara Falls, on the border between Canada and the United States, and about twice the height of Victoria Falls, on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe in Africa. It is a single drop waterfall.

Upriver from the falls, the Potaro Plateau stretches out to the distant escarpment of the Pakaraima Mountains. The Potaro River empties into the Essequibo River which is one of the longest and widest rivers in South America and the longest river in Guyana.

Getting to Kaieteur is either a 5-7 day land trek or a one hour flight from Ogle airport, the smaller field near downtown Georgetown. 

Adventure by Lana Jünor
Lana is from Guyana, she is your average reggae listening, ATV riding, nature loving, field hockey playing, jazz vibing girl who lives for the next fete!

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

 

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 
You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

WINNING ADVENTURE: WEEK ONE

Congratulations to Isabel Robinson for the best ‘added adventure’ of the week with ‘Elephant Sanctuary’.

Check out Isabel's winning adventure below, and be sure to
Add your Adventures this week and get in the running to win a US$250 e-card from The North Face.

Elephant Village is an elephant sanctuary that travellers can visit in Luang Prabang, Laos. It is operated by caring individuals who focus on protection and rehabilitation of elephants in Laos, many of which have been rescued from logging operations.

Their mission is to provide a peaceful, safe home and sustainable future for elephants in Laos. Tourism activities give them the opportunity to support themselves and the neighbouring villages. 

People can take part in the daily activities and routine of the elephants, walking through the jungle and bathing twice a day, then learning the commands in Lao that the Elephants will respond to and also how to get them to move through your body language and movements.

Adventure by Isabel Robinson
Isabel is from Quito, Ecuador, She is a photographer, traveller and in love with everything that is green and blue on this planet!

 

Be sure to ADD YOUR ADVENTURES for your chance to WIN!

 

Find out how to play the game and read our Game FAQ's. 
You can also view our competition Terms and Conditions.

 

#geo, #intel

SAVING OUR PLANET FROM MASS TOURISM

Underpinning much of what we do at Adventure Junky is the desire to reimagine travel. Mass tourism in its many guises - packaged tours, large cruise liners, theme parks, bus tours - now dominates our planet, in much the same way the junk food industry does, with equally dire consequences for our well-being, environment and cultural identities.

The Tourism industry is like an iceberg. It constitutes 10 percent of the world’s GDP and indirectly creates 1 in 10 jobs, yet is so woven into our lives it often goes unnoticed unless we’re on holiday. Tourism is a complex, layered, and pervasive industry and therein lies the problem. The best way to unpack the iceberg analogy is with one of the icons of mass travel – large cruise liners.

We have a top secret, patent-pending algorithm which we use to create a score for each adventure (travel experience) on the Adventure Junky App - but when you boil it down there’s two simple selection criteria we apply: 1. Is it ‘high’ on experience? (Is it unique, authentic, meaningful); 2. Is it ‘low’ on impact? (does it respect people and place). I’ll begin with the question of ‘impact’.

Friend’s of the Earth produce an annual report card on Cruise Liners if you are thinking of cruising. Only 4 out of 17 companies received pass marks this year. What strikes you instantly from an impact perspective is the fact that cruise liners legally only need to be 3 nautical miles (5.5 kilometres) from shore before they can dump sewage into the ocean - potentially up to 25,000 gallons of sewage daily from toilet systems alone. 

Then there’s the water from the laundry, pools, medical facilities, spas and dry cleaning stations. It all has to go somewhere. The argument here is that the ocean has miraculous purifying qualities for the fecal matter, bacteria, viruses, pathogens, hazardous waste and pharmaceuticals contained within this sewage. Or it could just be a case of out of sight, out of mind. This sewage is actually extremely harmful to human health and aquatic life. One can imagine the furore if the same was tried on dry land.

According to Ocean Planet, one study of a cruise ship found that an anchor dropped on a coral reef completely destroyed an area about half the size of a football field, and half as much again was covered by rubble and later died. It was estimated that coral recovery would take 50 years. In 2015, Carnival dropped an anchor in the wrong place in the Cayman Islands; over a thousand square metres of live coral was damaged or completely destroyed. Officials said it could take 60 years to grow back.

There is of course a considerable argument for the positive impacts of cruising made by the industry itself. Many of these centre on the economic benefit cruise ships bring to local destinations. Having worked in tourism development with indigenous cultures in remote tropical locations I have an intimate understanding of the role tourism can play in sustainable development for such communities. Tourism needs to be conducted on the local community’s terms.

Local people are not generally employed by the ships. It’s true the ships bring an influx of visitors with money to spend, but cruise companies do everything they can to encourage passengers to spend where it suits them - onboard. Stopovers are also very brief and passenger time on the islands is almost non-existent. The estimated amount a cruise passenger will spend on an island excursion, if they do chose to disembark (many don't) is less than $100.

Cruise companies in the Caribbean are now purchasing their own islands, or parts of islands to completely bypass the local communities. On these ‘passengers only’ islands cruise companies reap the profits of selling drinks, souvenirs, boat rides, and renting equipment for snorkelling, etc. Of the eight major cruise lines operating in the Caribbean, six own private islands which they include on their itineraries cutting out local ports of call. 

But what of the cruise liner experience? This gets to the heart of what we believe at Adventure Junky. Adventure is a powerful force. Being in nature and engaging respectfully with other cultures, stepping out one’s comfort zone is the best way for us to develop individuals and learn about ourselves and the world around us. The latest cruise ships now come complete with wave machines, ice rinks and climbing walls - but these things exist in the natural world and if you want to get a maximum score on ‘experience’ that’s where they are best enjoyed - authenticity is what makes for the best adventures.

Yet the cruise industry steams ahead. In 2016 and 2017, 15 more new cruise ships will come online adding 8.1% to global passenger capacity and add $3.6 billion in annual revenue. Weeks of fresh sea air, endless sunshine, and having every whim catered for does have its appeal. Many cruise passengers report returning home with a sinking feeling. It may be more than simply post-holiday blues. Most cruise passengers gain a pound a day in weight during a two-week holiday at sea - coming back a stone heavier than when they left.

So whilst I haven't held back in my criticism for large cruise liners, there are companies that care. On the whole though the industry represents many of the problems inherent of mass tourism. My point is not - not to travel - but to instead consider your choices wisely and think about the broader implications. There's plenty of 'high' experience, 'low' impact holidays on the Adventure Junky App.

The mountains are calling and I must go!
Nigel Malone

7 Tips for Adding Adventure Success...

Tips from Nigel Malone,  Adventure Junky Co-Founder and Adventure Curator 

Tips from Nigel Malone,  Adventure Junky Co-Founder and Adventure Curator 

Adding your personal adventures to the Adventure Junky App is great way to share them with the world, but also to earn points and prizes.

The process is pretty simple, you can either add them through the app or the desktop site which is handy if you keep your images off-camera or want to add several adventures at once.

To add an adventure you need to provide some core information about the adventure:
– a brief description
– images
– location

Sounds easy, but there is an art to getting your adventure approved by the Adventure Junky curation team. I should know I lead the team and am the final decision-maker!

Here’s my advice...

1. take great pictures
Your adventure might have been incredible, but without great pictures it’s hard for us to add it to the App. If we really love your adventure we might undertake research to find images we can use, or possibly purchase them from other photographers. This means your submission will be delayed or even more likely rejected.

2. make it personal
We’re not fans of mass tourism - cruises, bus tours, etc going to the same old tourist spots. Those types of adventures get instant rejection. We prefer smaller group adventures, personal experiences, to places we’ve never heard of before. It could be a simple as a short walk to a nearby waterfall or as complex as a mountain biking expedition in Ethiopia - it’s all about experiences that mean something to you on a personal level.

3. be specific
We tend to look at adventures as an activity (or multiple activities) in a specific location or region. For example ‘Baltic Sea sailing’ or ‘Mountain Biking in Manly’. This allows us to accurately allocate points to the adventure. It also makes it easier for others to plan and complete your adventures. So think of adventures as self-contained episodes, rather than ‘my trip to Italy’ or ‘Summer holidays’.

4. minor details
We love it when you tell us everything there is to know about a specific adventure - for those that would like to follow in your footsteps. It makes our life easier if your description is accurate and detailed, but don’t feel like you have to write a novel. If it’s a great adventure, all we need is the core information, like place names and trail names, literally a few bullet points that can help us identify where you went and what you did.

5. low or no impact please
Conservation is one of our core values, both of environments and cultural identities. If your adventure addresses this issue, you go to the front of the queue. I’ll also let you in on a secret, our scoring system is weighted in favour of such adventures, so everyone is a winner.

6. tell your friends
Every time someone likes (taps the heart icon) one of your successfully added adventures, or check-ins to your adventure, you earn bonus points. So if and when your adventure is approved and added to the app (you’ll receive a notification on your device, ensure notifications are turned on) makes sure you tell your friends to download the Adventure Junky app and take a look.

7. business versus pleasure
Strictly speaking we prefer your added adventures to be self-guided, that is adventures you have undertaken mostly of your own accord, not entirely organised by a tour company. Let’s just say self-guided adventures have a much higher success rate of approval than guided (organised) trips.

The best route for Tour Operators to appear on the App is to take a look at our Partnerships Packages.

I sincerely hope this helps you in adding your adventures, scoring points and winning prizes!
If you’d like to understand more about how the whole process works take a look at our ADD FAQ’s.

Look forward to seeing more of your Incredible Adventures. 
Until then the mountains are calling and I must go!

Nigel Malone,
Adventure Junky Co-Founder and Adventure Curator

ADVENTURELOG #14

7 more magnificent adventures added by the Adventure Junky tribe...

iPhone and iPad users can tap any image and go direct to the adventure.

Machu Picchu is 15th-century Inca citadel situated on a mountain ridge 2,430 metres above sea level. It is located in the Cusco Region, Urubamba Province, Machupicchu District in Peru, above the Sacred Valley, some 80 kilometres northwest of Cuzco. Machu Picchu was declared a Peruvian Historical Sanctuary in 1981 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983. In 2007, Machu Picchu was voted one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in a worldwide Internet poll. (photo Nimmi Solomon)  Added by Lukasz Warzecha

Machu Picchu is 15th-century Inca citadel situated on a mountain ridge 2,430 metres above sea level. It is located in the Cusco Region, Urubamba Province, Machupicchu District in Peru, above the Sacred Valley, some 80 kilometres northwest of Cuzco. Machu Picchu was declared a Peruvian Historical Sanctuary in 1981 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983. In 2007, Machu Picchu was voted one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in a worldwide Internet poll. (photo Nimmi Solomon) 
Added by Lukasz Warzecha

Hidden in Mexico, it's something out a fantasy novel: a wide, sandy cavern with the blue waters of the Pacific rushing in. It's part of a chain of islands formed by underwater volcano eruptions. Added by Nigel Malone

Hidden in Mexico, it's something out a fantasy novel: a wide, sandy cavern with the blue waters of the Pacific rushing in. It's part of a chain of islands formed by underwater volcano eruptions.
Added by Nigel Malone

There are hundred of Islands along the coast line, 99% of which are uninhabited, with some of the clearest ocean abundant with wildlife, sharks, dolphins and seals are all very common.   Added by Dominic Bond

There are hundred of Islands along the coast line, 99% of which are uninhabited, with some of the clearest ocean abundant with wildlife, sharks, dolphins and seals are all very common.  
Added by Dominic Bond

If the wind is right, you have almost 1000m of paragliding joy from the takeoff at Areskutan to the landing on the lake during winter and grass fields during the summer. (photo Anders Carlsson)  Added by Viktor Stråhlen

If the wind is right, you have almost 1000m of paragliding joy from the takeoff at Areskutan to the landing on the lake during winter and grass fields during the summer. (photo Anders Carlsson) 
Added by Viktor Stråhlen

Nelson's Ledges Trail is a 0.8 mile loop trail in Ohio, that features beautiful wild flowers. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. (photo Robbie Mueller) Added by Theresa Difranco

Nelson's Ledges Trail is a 0.8 mile loop trail in Ohio, that features beautiful wild flowers. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. (photo Robbie Mueller)
Added by Theresa Difranco

Some of the best geysers in the world are located in Haukadalur geothermal field. One of these geysers - Geysir - has given name to this phenomenon and provides some of the most spectacular eruptions worldwide.  Added by Inga Hrönn

Some of the best geysers in the world are located in Haukadalur geothermal field. One of these geysers - Geysir - has given name to this phenomenon and provides some of the most spectacular eruptions worldwide. 
Added by Inga Hrönn

The Belogradchik rocks form a 3 km wide, 30 kilometre long strip, some formations reach 200m in height. Formed at the bottom of a sea some 230 million years ago. (photo Ivailo Djilianov)  Added by Aneliq Chelingerova    

The Belogradchik rocks form a 3 km wide, 30 kilometre long strip, some formations reach 200m in height. Formed at the bottom of a sea some 230 million years ago. (photo Ivailo Djilianov) 
Added by Aneliq Chelingerova

 

 

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ADVENTURELOG #13

7 more magnificent adventures added by the Adventure Junky tribe...

iPhone and iPad users can tap any image and go direct to the adventure.

Danakil Depression in the Afar region of eastern Ethiopia is one of the harshest and hottest places on Earth. Temperatures sore higher than 45 degrees Celsius by morning, and the lunar landscape is dusty and drier than any desert. It is unforgiving and relentless, but a host to some of the most unique geological structures - from chains of sulphur craters, acidic pools, reflecting salt lakes to steaming geysers and pillars of salt and mushroom shaped volcanic rock.  Added by John Collins

Danakil Depression in the Afar region of eastern Ethiopia is one of the harshest and hottest places on Earth. Temperatures sore higher than 45 degrees Celsius by morning, and the lunar landscape is dusty and drier than any desert. It is unforgiving and relentless, but a host to some of the most unique geological structures - from chains of sulphur craters, acidic pools, reflecting salt lakes to steaming geysers and pillars of salt and mushroom shaped volcanic rock. 
Added by John Collins

This walk will give you one of Tasmania's most celebrated views over the beautiful white sands of Wineglass Bay. The track is a short, fairly steep climb to the saddle between Mt Amos and Mt Mayson. (photo Daniel Sallai)  Added by Ravi Rudner

This walk will give you one of Tasmania's most celebrated views over the beautiful white sands of Wineglass Bay. The track is a short, fairly steep climb to the saddle between Mt Amos and Mt Mayson. (photo Daniel Sallai) 
Added by Ravi Rudner

These crown jewels of Aspen host a number of fine snow climbs and a spectacular ridge traverse with some of the finest views in Colorado. (photo Patrick Lewis) Added by Marc Spicer

These crown jewels of Aspen host a number of fine snow climbs and a spectacular ridge traverse with some of the finest views in Colorado. (photo Patrick Lewis) Added by Marc Spicer

Diamond Harbour is a small settlement on Banks Peninsula, in New Zealand. It's name reputedly comes from the resemblance of sunlight on the water to the shining of diamonds. Added by Echo Widmer

Diamond Harbour is a small settlement on Banks Peninsula, in New Zealand. It's name reputedly comes from the resemblance of sunlight on the water to the shining of diamonds. Added by Echo Widmer

Matanuska Glacier is one of Alaska's most accessible glaciers, a 27-mile long river of ice poking out of the Chugach Mountains that is visible for miles along the Glenn Highway in Southcentral Alaska. (photo Dhilung Kirat) Added by Jesse Haines 

Matanuska Glacier is one of Alaska's most accessible glaciers, a 27-mile long river of ice poking out of the Chugach Mountains that is visible for miles along the Glenn Highway in Southcentral Alaska. (photo Dhilung Kirat)
Added by Jesse Haines
 

Glowworms aren't even worms, they're insects, they glow through bioluminescence - Get ready for a completely cosmic experience! It's like standing directly beneath the Milky Way. Added by Nigel Malone 

Glowworms aren't even worms, they're insects, they glow through bioluminescence - Get ready for a completely cosmic experience! It's like standing directly beneath the Milky Way. Added by Nigel Malone 

It's worth planning your adventure to Voss, in Norway, around Extreme Sports Week - an annual festival showcasing a wide range of mountain, river and air sports with loads of live music! Added by Josh Caple 

It's worth planning your adventure to Voss, in Norway, around Extreme Sports Week - an annual festival showcasing a wide range of mountain, river and air sports with loads of live music! Added by Josh Caple 

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